The DC Recovery Network

Solving Community Fragmentation by Strengthening the Voices of Consumers in DC

ABOUT THE DC RECOVERY NETWORK

The DC Recovery Network (DCRN) is a project that aims to strengthen and unify the voices of consumers in the District of Columbia, resolving community fragmentation that results from unaddressed and untreated mental illnesses and substance addictions. To do so, the DCRN focuses on building peer support infrastructure and reinvigorating organizational collaboration, bringing unique events and programs to the city.

For more on The DC Recovery Network, read up on our founding literature below, or go to www.dcrecoverynetwork.org.

Why we do:

In the District of Columbia, the statistics regarding mental, emotional and psychological issues and substance addiction disorders reveal a distressing state of affairs. From 2011 to 2012, annual averages from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health show that, among individuals over the age of 18, approximately:

  • 17,000 individuals needed but did not receive treatment for illicit drug use.
  • 59,000 individuals needed but did not receive treatment for excessive alcohol use.
  • 34,000 individuals had at least one Major Depressive Episode.
  • 21,000 individuals had serious thoughts of suicide. 
  • 17,000 individuals lived with a diagnosable serious mental illness.**

Out of this glaring need, the DC Recovery Network (DCRN) project was created to strengthen and unify the collective voice of persons with lived experience of mental, emotional and psychological issues and substance addiction disorders. In its creation, the DCRN was designed to be led by 4 comprehensive goals:

GOAL 1   |   Enable all DC peers to locate resources for recovery, simultaneously facilitating their involvement in recovery systems transformation.
GOAL 2   |   Increase innovative recovery programming for underserved communities.
GOAL 3   |   Reinforce the peer support workforce and general employment readiness training.
GOAL 4   |   Strengthen partnerships among DC mental health and substance abuse organizations, national peer advocacy groups, and regional service providers.
What we do:

In order to meet and surpass these goals, the DCRN was further strategically designed around 15 specific objectives, each with a fundamental focus on empowering DC consumers. The DCRN will meet its goals by:

GOAL 1 Objectives   |   Providing referral services and prevention information to DC residents in need; Creating opportunities for DC peers to collaborate with providers, clinicians, and agencies; Strengthening local recovery infrastructure through collaboration with allied agencies; Amplifying allied agencies' outreach through distributing relevant articles and information; Maintaining an informative online presence and publishing a quarterly newsletter.
GOAL 2 Objectives   |   Establishing multilingual and special interest resources online; Bridging peer outreach with youth/young adults, veterans, LGBTQ persons, and persons of color; Giving technical and development assistance of culturally-unique peer groups.
GOAL 3 Objectives   |   Facilitating training and certification courses in Wellness Recovery Action Planning; Training and credentialing new Peer Support Specialists through Certification Trainings; Delivering continuing education opportunities to DC's Certified Peer Specialists; Leading workforce development and employment readiness workshops.
GOAL 4 Objectives   |   Initiating and maintaining cross-disability working relationships; Promoting national and regional consumer organizations and allies through accessible events; Working with self-help and twelve-step groups to provide wellness and awareness messaging. 

By working alongside consumers, clinicians, and advocates to encourage successful recovery, DCRN is promoting the very wellbeing of the entire DC community! To get more information or inquire about the possibility of collaboration with the DCRN, email info@thecampbellcenter.org

*  The DCRN is partially funded by the Statewide Consumer Networking Grant (SCN Grant) from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). 
**  Source